• Geboortedatum: 31/03/1897
  • Geboorteplaats: Onbekend
  • Datum van overlijden: 26/10/1917
  • Plaats van overlijden: Poelkapelle, BelgiĆ«
  • Doodsoorzaak: Killed in action (K.I.A.)
  • Leeftijd: 20
  • Beroep: Mijnwerker
  • Land: Wales, Verenigd Koninkrijk
  • Rang: Able Seaman
  • Service nummer: Z/891
  • Dienstneming datum: 03/05/1915
  • Dienstneming plaats: Onbekend
  • Laatst gekende eenheid: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, 8th Bn. (Anson)
  • Strijdmacht: British Expeditionary Force

Gedenkplaats

Extra informatie

Able Seaman Harry Berry served in the Anson Battalion, part of the 188th Infantry Brigade of the 63rd Royal Naval Division. On the 26th of October the unit participated in the Second Battle of Passchendaele, a stage in the Third Battle of Ypres. Having arrived in Ypres on the 23rd of October, the battalion moved into the front line South of Poelcapelle on the 24th of October. On the 26th of October at zero hour the battalion started its attack. D Company was on the right, A Company on the left, C Company was in reserve and B Company was in support. The battalion had difficulties with movement because the ground over which they had to advance was a mass of shell holes that went up to five feet deep and were filled with water. The rest of the ground was filled with mud into which the men sank up to their knees. A Company on the left was held up by heavy machine gun fire and suffered severely, and D Company had lost all its officers, but did manage to gain all their objectives. They were, however, compelled to fall back owing to an attack on their right and had to dug themselves in until they were relieved. In spite of these difficulties the battalion pressed on and gained the greater part of their objectives. By 7.20 a.m. the battalion had captured Varlet Farm and by 8 a.m. Banff House was captured and the battalion was consolidating its gains. During this attack, Able Seaman Berry was killed in action along with 260 other soldiers of the Anson Battalion who were either killed, wounded or missing. He is now remembered in the Tyne Cot Memorial.