Pte
Horace Clive Andrews

Informations sur naissance

Date de naissance:
29/06/1899
Lieu de naissance:
Mile End, County of London, Angleterre, Royaume-Uni

Informations service militaire

Pays:
Angleterre, Royaume-Uni
Force armée:
British Expeditionary Force
Rang:
Private
Numéro de service:
G/68253
Unités:
 —  London Regiment, 2/4th Bn. (Royal Fusiliers)  (Dernière unité connue)

Informations sur décès

Date de décès:
26/10/1917
Lieu de décès:
Cameron House, Belgique
Cause du décès:
Killed in action (K.I.A.)
Âge:
18

Cimetière

Cement House Cemetery
Parcelle: X
Rangée: A
Tombe: 45

Distinctions et médailles 3

1914-15 Star
Médaille
British War Medal
Médaille
Victory Medal
Médaille

Complément d'informations

It was during this operation that private Horace Clive Andrews died. Private Horace Clive Andrews was missing in action for a long time, and it wasn’t clear wether he had died or was wounded or taken prisoner somewhere. Eventually his body was found, and was laid to rest at Cement House Cemetery. A report made by lance corporal T.J. Holland, who was also part of the 2/4th Battalion, stated the circumstances which presumably led to private Horace Clive Andrews’ death. At 6.45 a.m. on October 26th, they went over from the shell hole line at Poelcapelle. They had gone approximately 500 yards, when they had to take cover in a shell hole from snipers. When lance corporal Holland looked around, he saw that private Horace Clive Andrews had been hit. When he asked him where, private Andrews held his side. Because the shell holes were up to the waist filled with water, the First Aid bags were wet and as a result, they had nothing to bandage him with. There were also no stretcher bearers. Lance corporal Holland had to carry on. It was the last he saw of private Horace Clive Andrews. When he left him, private Andrews was conscious, and did not seem in pain or badly hit.
The attack was to be delivered under creeping barrage, supported by heavy guns, machine-guns and smoke barrages. On the morning of the 25th of October, the 2/4th Battalion left Siege Camp in battle order. At 1.15 p.m. the Battalion was completely assembled east of Poelcapelle. At 5.40 a.m., the 26th of October the British barrage came down, the 2/2nd and 2/3rd Battalions were followed by the 2/4th Battalion. The 2/2nd Battalion succesfuly captured 4 pillboxes, of which 3 were located at Cameron House. The 2/3rd Battalion captured a crossroad which was then believed to be the Spider Crossroads, but which was probably a less important crossroad, 250 yards short of Spider-Crossroads. The line of this crossroad and Cameron House formed the limit of the advance made by the 173rd Brigade. The 2/4th Battalion meanwhile succeeded in taking Tracas Farm. A Company of the samen Battalion reached Cameron House, while D Company reached Mebu (V21 C06). The enemy launched a counter-attack, which caused heavy casualties, and succeeded to drive the 273rd Brigade back to their assembly line. At 10.15 p.m., the 173rd Battalion was relieved by the 2/1st and 2/7th Battalions.
It was during this operation that private Horace Clive Andrews died. Private Horace Clive Andrews was missing in action for a long time, and it wasn’t clear wether he had died or was wounded or taken prisoner somewhere. Eventually his body was found, and was laid to rest at Cement House Cemetery. A report made by lance corporal T.J. Holland, who was also part of the 2/4th Battalion, stated the circumstances which presumably led to private Horace Clive Andrews’ death. At 6.45 a.m. on October 26th, they went over from the shell hole line at Passchendaele. They had gone approximately 500 yards, when they had to take cover in a shell hole from snipers. When lance corporal Holland looked around, he saw that private Horace Clive Andrews had been hit. When he asked him where, private Andrews held his side. Because the shell holes were up to the waist filled with water, the First Aid bags were wet and as a result, they had nothing to bandage him with. There were also no stretcher bearers. Lance corporal Holland had to carry on. It was the last he saw of private Horace Clive Andrews. When he left him, private Andrews was conscious, and did not seem in pain or badly hit.

Sources 6

"The Third Ypres Passchendaele. The Day-by-Day Account", McCarthy C., London, Arms & Armour Press, 1995, p. 129.
Sources utilisées
"The War History of the 4th Battalion The London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers). 1914-1919", Grimwade, F.C., London, Headquarters of the 4th London Regiment, 1922, p. 317-320.
Sources utilisées
Ancestry
http://home.ancestry.co.uk/
Sources utilisées
CWGC
http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/97317/ANDREWS,%20HORACE%20CLIVE
Sources utilisées
The Long Long Trail
http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/
Sources utilisées
War Diary, 58th Division, 173rd Infantry Brigade London Regiment 2/4 Battalion, 26th of October 1917
http://www.nmarchive.com/
Sources utilisées