Informationen zu Geburt

Geburtsdatum:
25/09/1897
Geburtsort:
Perham, Minnesota, Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika

Allgemeine Informationen

Beruf:
Arbeiter

Informationen zum Armeedienst

Land:
Canada
Truppe:
British Expeditionary Force
Rang:
Private
Dienstnummer:
781446
Einberufung datum:
15/12/1915
Einberufung ort:
Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada
Einheiten:
 —  Canadian Infantry, 28th Bn. (North West)  (Letzte bekannte Einheit)

Informationen zu Tod

Sterbedatum:
07/11/1917
Sterbeort:
No. 44 Casualty Clearing Station, Nine Elms, Poperinge, Belgien
Todesursache:
Verwundet
Alter:
20

Begräbnisplatz

Nine Elms British Cemetery
Grabstelle: VIII
Reihe: C
Grab: 7

Auszeichnungen und Orden 2

British War Medal
Medaille
Victory Medal
Medaille

Punkte von Interesse 2

#1 Geburtsort
#2 Einberufung ort

Meine Geschichte

Private Robert Roy McKibben served in the Canadian Infantry 28th Battalion, which was part of the 6th Brigade of the 2nd Canadian Division. On 6 November 1917 the 27th, 31st and 28th Battalion of the 6th Brigade, together with the 2nd Brigade of the 1st Canadian Division, attacked the village of Passchendaele. This attack was part of the Second Battle of Passchendaele, the final stage of the Third Battle of Ypres.

At 6.00 a.m. the allied artillery opened up an incredibly heavy artillery barrage on the crest of the Passchendaele Ridge. The attack was accompanied with an enormous amount of shellfire on both sides, but the swampy nature of the ground made a lot of shells to misfire. The Germans defended the Passchendaele ridge with machinegun fire from pill-boxes, situated at strategic points, like crossroads and ruined farms. The German main line of defence ran along the Passchendaele-Mosselmarkt Road. This line however lacked the protection of concrete dug-outs and many Germans were killed due to the allied barrage, others were quickly seen fleeing from the line, but the concrete pill-boxes still remained a threat. Notwithstanding the heavy machine gun fire the advancing troops pressed on, outflanking and clearing the pill-boxes.

By 7.40 a.m. all Companies had reached their objectives. Consolidation was completed shortly after 10.00 a.m. The Battalion suffered 35 casualties during the attack itself. However once the men occupied the hillcrest the Germans put down a heavy barrage on the Canadians. On top of this the Canadian troops were frequently strafed by German aeroplanes. Parties of stretcher bearers encountered great difficulties in evacuating the wounded, due to the shelling and the ghastly state of the ground.

Private Robert Roy McKibben was gravely injured during the attack of 6 November 1917. He sustained shrapnel wounds to his abdomen and was evacuated to No. 44 Casualty Clearing Station, at Nine Elms in the town of Poperinge. He succumbed to his wounds on the following day and was buried at the adjacent Nine Elms British Cemetery.

Dateien 1

Quellen 7

"Passchendaele. The Day-by-Day Account", McCarthy C., London, Uniform, 2018, pg. 160-161.
Verwendete Quellen
"The Story of the Twenty-Eight (Northwest) Battalion, 1914-1917", Dewitt G.E., London, Charles & Son, s.d., pg. 22-24.
Verwendete Quellen
Ancestry
http://home.ancestry.co.uk/
Weitere Quellen
CWGC
https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/137083/mckibben,-robert-roy/
Verwendete Quellen
Service Records
http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/personnel-records/Pages/item.aspx?IdNumber=160721
Verwendete Quellen
The Long Long Trail
http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/
Verwendete Quellen
War Diary Canadian Infantry 28th Bn.
https://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/archivianet/02015202_e.html
Verwendete Quellen